Episode 4: Lone Star State of Intoxication

Welcome to Texas, y’all! Tiney and Laura offer a guided tour of their native state’s history with booze, the popular regions and cities, and personal brewery and winery recommendations.

Whatchu drinkin’?

IMG_8532Kvass by Jester King Brewery: This farmhouse ale is brewed with 300 pounds of miche rye bread from a bakery in Austin, Texas called Miche Bread. Kvass is a style defined by the use of bread in the mash bill and it offers an excellent alternative to throwing away the food when it’s past it prime to serve in its original form. This one has a funky, earthy, and rustic flavor profile. I describe it as having barnyard and bready characteristic in aroma with medium carbonation and a tart finish.

 

IMG_8529Becker Iconoclast 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon: Iconoclast is Beckers best selling wine, which is technically a Bordeaux style blend (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, and Petit Verdot) but Cabernet Sauvignon makes up the vast majority of the blend. This Texas wine goes down easy with violets, vanilla, baking spices, and dried cherries on the nose, followed by dark berries, plums, and coffee on the palate. Great example of a Texas cab!

History of Beer

The Texas State Historical Association is rife with info on Texas’ brewing culture, which basically starts with the German immigrants. It credits William Menger’s Western Brewery on the Alamo Square in San Antonio as the first commercial brewery in the state, having opening in 1878.

Shiner is likely the most popular Texas beer. It’s made at the Spoetzal Brewery, was which opened in 1909 by Shiner-based businessmen trying to appeal to the German immigrants. The brewery’s name was different then, because shortly thereafter, an immigrant named Kosmas Spoetzal purchased it. Its signature beer is Shiner Bock, which was first brewed in 1913.

Tiney’s North Texas beer recommendations:

  1. Mosaic IPA by Community Beer Co.: This is my favorite locally-brewed IPA. It’s a dark amber color with a high level of malty flavor. It’s delicious, but watch out — 8% alcohol content, it’s can sneak up on you.
  2. Peticolas Brewing Co. in Dallas is one of the city’s best breweries. It’s a beer nerd’s dream serving more than a dozen different recipes. The beers are predominantly no-frills, classic styles, though some of them, like the flagship Velvet Hammer imperial red ale, showcase Peticolas’ unique personality. Peticolas only serves its beer on draft, so you can imbibe it at the brewery or one of the many beer bars in Dallas-Fort Worth.
  3. Houston is home to one of Texas’ oldest and most prestigious craft breweries, Saint Arnold Brewing Co. I’ve never visited, but I would really like to.

History of Wine

The first time we see wine being cultivated in Texas is around 1650 in El Paso where Spanish missionaries are planting grapes to make sacramental wine. That’s about 100 years earlier than California was planting! Just like we see in European history, wine spread with religion and missionaries through the country. Prohibition in the United States lasted from 1920-1933 and decimated booze business nationwide, with only the largest, wealthiest producers and some sacramental producers surviving. Revival in winemaking kicked up across the country in the 1970s, and really gained momentum after the Judgement of Paris, a blind taste test in Paris that ranked California wines as some of the top in the world!

Llano Estacado is one of the first major players to bring Texas back in the wine scene after they opened in 1976, and they’re now the second largest producer in the state (behind the University of Texas/St.Genevieve). Mesilla Valley was the first recognized AVA (American Viticultural Area) in Texas, although most of the AVA is located in New Mexico. The first full viticultural area located in Texas, Bell Mountain, wasn’t founded until 1986 (Laura’s birth year!). The largest AVA located in Texas, Texas Hill Country, was designated in 1991, it is also the second largest AVA in the country although only ~1,100 acres are occupied by vineyards. There are over 200 wineries across the state of Texas, and more on the way!

Top grapes produced in Texas include, but are not limited to, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Tempranillo, Black Spanish (Lenoir), Viognier, Muscat, Blanc de Bois, and Syrah.  

TV Munson Nursery Catalog

Undoubtedly one of my wine AND Texas heros, TV Munson has made several appearances in our podcast episodes. He made invaluable contributions to wine and botany through his travels and journals depicting native American vines, but supported his family through his nursery business in Denison, TX. This week’s episode I mention that while in class at his namesake school I got to see one of the original catalogs from ~1876!! It is obviously a little old to handle, so the listings inside are photocopies made when Professor Snyder originally purchased the catalog.

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Texas Wine Regions:

Follow these links to learn more about each of the Texas American Viticultural Area!

Texas High Plains

Texas Hill Country

Fredericksburg

Escondido

The Bell Mountain

Davis Mountain

Mesilla Valley

Texoma

Lots of great Texas wine infographics available here. And if you’re looking for a detailed and definitive list of wineries in Texas check this site out!

Resources:

Texas State Historical Association

https://txwinelover.com/texas-wineries-map/

https://www.houstonpress.com/restaurants/infographic-all-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-texas-wine-and-more-6422587

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